Styling tips every man should follow this season Here are some ideas by stylists you can pick up from to look sharp during the winter season.


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After the relentless heat of the summer, it’s hard not to get excited about the fall. The winter styles are all about mixing different colours and; keeping everything sleek and minimal so its time to start preparing for your essential acquisitions which you need for this fall season.

Rohan Khattar, Co-Founder of Minizmo high fashion menswear label and Avneet Chadha, Celebrity Stylist have suggested ideas for looking sharp during the winter season.

Introduction to light layering

Investing in the right layering pieces and right material with different colours and shades is something one needs to be cautious about. Stock up your wardrobe with a great mix of long and short sleeved T-shirts, lightweight collared shirts, a cool sports jacket and of course a comfortable sweater.

Wool it up

The time one spends buying upper body layers leaves them with a limited amount for warming up the legs. Giving comfort to your lower body in the cooler months is to switch to wool fabric. Lightweight woollen pants work great for the season, and you can always team it up with your basic shirt and blazer.

Textures

Woollen knits, suede or velvet and even cotton fabrics with velvet ribs is a good way to keep your look interesting while keeping it easy on the eyes at the same time. This can be best done when you follow solid colours in textured fabrics. You can always match them up with dark solids or lighter greys and other soft shades.

Play it solid

With the layers taking its place, it is also time for solid, muted colours. It might not be a rule to follow, but the solid earthy tones and darker shades of orange, green go well with the season. Men should always keep it minimal with solids and not layer them in a way that makes the look come across as overpowering. Keep the colours varied, but they should mostly be solid and try creating a pattern with the solid layers you plan to wear.

How to take better cycling photos

Looking to pap a rider during a race, or want to take better pictures in the mountains? We've got tips from a pro
 

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It’s hairpins that always get me. There’s an exquisite right hand swoop about a mile from my house, it features on a regular training ride and has tormented me from day one.

The scene looks like a tantalisingly good picture to the naked eye yet the quality simply won’t allow itself to be recreated with a camera. At least not by me.

“I’m the same… I always look at hairpins… occasionally it works but usually they look really bland and boring,” says cycling photographer Michael Blann.

Despite sharing the same frustrations with those elusive hairpins, Blann’s photography know-how has seen him secure a job as Getty Images’ ‘London Creative Photographer’, shoot commercial projects for some of the biggest brands in cycling and publish a stunning collection in his book ‘Mountains: Epic Cycling Climbs’.

Blann spent a year racing for an elite team in Australia, but quickly realised his place in cycling wasn’t as a professional rider. It’s only recently he’s been able to focus his career so squarely on his lifelong love of cycling: “It’s been a slow process but has picked up pace in the last five to 10 years as cycling’s really got popular,” he says.

His most recent collection focuses heavily on the climbs which have given bike races so much of their colour over the years, the mountains where riders have engaged in battles we rarely see on the flat – probably because the whole display is moving so fast you need to be in the melee to catch the detail.

“In my heart I’m a landscape photographer. I’m not one to focus on the action – my approach was to take a step back and put the whole of the race into a context with the landscape,” says Blann.

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Ever improving smartphones and the continual upward growth of platforms like Instagram means that – whilst the pros will always have a quality we can’t even hope to emulate – a lot of us are having a go.

If you’re looking to get a coveted picture of your favourite riders in action, or you’re seeking Insta-stardom that isn’t all about ‘hashtagmylunchtoday’, then Blann has some tips.

Don’t disregard popular culture, but know your overall goal

“Having any sort of social media platform to get your work out there is good – I’ve found lots of interesting photographers via Instagram, I think it’s a great thing.

“There’s an awful lot of people on there photographing their café rides and lunch… which is fine… but it really depends where you want to place your work. Are you trying to make stunning photography, or trying to document your day for your friends to see?

“If you’re more business focused I think you have to theme your page, you can’t just throw everything up there, jumping from dinner with friends to landscape photography.”

Know the goal of each picture

“You’ve got to work out what their motive is – what you’re trying to achieve. Do you want to capture action, or scenery, or something incidental?

“Work that out first – then it doesn’t matter if you’re on a smartphone or an expensive camera. The principles of photography are all the same.”

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Light and composition are key

“So much of photography is about light and composition, it almost doesn’t matter what you’re shooting off after that point.

“A lot of [judging that] that comes from experience, practice and instinct – you look at things and can see how it’s going to frame up. There are some basic rules we can all learn and apply, like the ‘rule of thirds’*.

 

5 fashion items that Audrey Hepburn made her own

 Belgian-born British actress Audrey Hepburn photographed wearing Givenchy for Glamour Magazine in June 1955 by Norman Parkinson.     If there is one takeaway from  Beyond the Screen , the new exhibition of rare Audrey Hepburn photographs opening at London’s Proud Central gallery today, it is to acknowledge how many specific fashion items the actress launched. Almost everything Hepburn is wearing in the images-  lensed by Terry O’Neill, Norman Parkinson, Bob Willoughby, et al- has gone on to be deemed a ‘classic’.  It may be 25 years since she died, but cable knit jumpers, white bug sunglasses, and oversized mannish white shirts are as chic, popular and relevant in the British fashion vocabulary in 2018 as they were when she first wore them. Here are five of the best fashion Hepburnisms that are still worth copying today...  White...

Belgian-born British actress Audrey Hepburn photographed wearing Givenchy for Glamour Magazine in June 1955 by Norman Parkinson.

 

If there is one takeaway from Beyond the Screen, the new exhibition of rare Audrey Hepburn photographs opening at London’s Proud Central gallery today, it is to acknowledge how many specific fashion items the actress launched. Almost everything Hepburn is wearing in the images-  lensed by Terry O’Neill, Norman Parkinson, Bob Willoughby, et al- has gone on to be deemed a ‘classic’.

It may be 25 years since she died, but cable knit jumpers, white bug sunglasses, and oversized mannish white shirts are as chic, popular and relevant in the British fashion vocabulary in 2018 as they were when she first wore them. Here are five of the best fashion Hepburnisms that are still worth copying today...

White...

Amazon’s Echo Look fashion assistant lacks critical contex

 Amazon’s  Echo Look  is an Alexa fashion assistant that combines human and machine intelligence to tell you how you look in an outfit, keeps track of what’s in your wardrobe, and recommends clothes to buy from Amazon.com.  Made generally available to the public in recent weeks, the Echo Look debuted in April 2017, but was available by invite only for more than a year — a first for Alexa-enabled devices. Over time, Amazon will team Echo Look with  Prime Wardrobe , an Amazon program akin to modern fashion companies like Stitch Fix and Trunk Club that lets users try on clothes and send back what they don’t want to buy. All the meanwhile, Amazon’s facial recognition software  Rekognition  keeps making headlines for being used by U.S. law enforcement agencies and  misidentifying more than two dozen members of Congress as criminals .  Let’s examine why it can be a lot of fun to use the Echo Look, why it took Amazon a year to make the device generally available, and why its fashion assistant’s AI is inherently biased.      

Amazon’s Echo Look is an Alexa fashion assistant that combines human and machine intelligence to tell you how you look in an outfit, keeps track of what’s in your wardrobe, and recommends clothes to buy from Amazon.com.

Made generally available to the public in recent weeks, the Echo Look debuted in April 2017, but was available by invite only for more than a year — a first for Alexa-enabled devices. Over time, Amazon will team Echo Look with Prime Wardrobe, an Amazon program akin to modern fashion companies like Stitch Fix and Trunk Club that lets users try on clothes and send back what they don’t want to buy. All the meanwhile, Amazon’s facial recognition software Rekognition keeps making headlines for being used by U.S. law enforcement agencies and misidentifying more than two dozen members of Congress as criminals.

Let’s examine why it can be a lot of fun to use the Echo Look, why it took Amazon a year to make the device generally available, and why its fashion assistant’s AI is inherently biased.